Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

Navigation

You are here: Home / weblog

Dominic Cronin's weblog

Showing blog entries tagged as: Java

Websphere and Xalan fun for SDL Web 8

Of the small number of people who follow this blog, an unreasonably large proportion will be familiar with SDL Web 8, and the promise it holds for freedom from classpath hell. The new service-based architecture is a huge step forward, but we aren't out of the woods yet. I'm currently busy with an upgrade project where we're taking an interesting mix of web applications from SDL Tridion 2011 to SDL Web 8.

Web 8's much-vaunted REST-ful microservice approach was initially communicated as pretty much a drop-in replacement for the existing Content Delivery APIs. In practice, it turned out that the focus on backwards compatibility wasn't as clear as it might have been, and if you use JSPPage when invoking dynamic component presentations from a JSP page, you are out of luck, because this class doesn't have an implementation in the REST-ful facade. This is annoying, as I can't see any reason why it couldn't or shouldn't be made to work. The missing support is a "known issue", however I'm told there's not much appetite for fixing it. After all, goes the argument, we can use the in-process API, which does have JSPPage, so that's a workaround isn't it? Except that then we don't get the benefit of the dependency-free service architecture, and that, as I shall explain, is no small thing. 

With the in-process API, of course, the idea is that all the necessary jars to do Tridion content delivery things have to be on your classpath. The general idea is simple enough, but in practice, we have to deal with the fact that there are several class-loaders arranged in a hierarchy, and each of these has their own classpath, although it's not always called that. At the top you've got the class loaders that belong to java itself. This means the boot classloader that loads the nuts and bolts of java itself, and also the one that works from the java CLASSPATH variable plus one for java extensions. And then lower down you have Websphere's own extensions classloader, some magic called the OSGi class loader gateway, and then the application's class loader and one for the module. Yes I know - it sounds pretty insane, but I didn't make it up. Have a look over here if you don't believe me! 

So what kind of trouble did we get into, and how did we get out of it? Well we had all the Web 8 jars in a directory, and we'd deployed our application and set things up so the jars would be on the classpath. Keeping the jars outside the application has been the customer's preferred way of doing things for some years, and it's worked well, so our initial expectation was that things should "just work", but once we started testing, we started to see exceptions like: 

[java.lang.ClassCastException: org.apache.xml.dtm.ref.DTMManagerDefault incompatible 
with org.apache.xml.dtm.DTMManager

This is a bit of a weird one,  because if you look up the sources, org.apache.xml.dtm.ref.DTMManagerDefault and org.apache.xml.dtm.DTMManager are actually defined in the same jar. How could they possibly be incompatible? Well as it turns out, it's possible for java to load two incompatible versions of the same jar simultaneously, from different jars. 

If you look it up, this problem is about the Xerxes library, and it's associated serialiser jar. I think this comes about because Websphere uses Xerxes itself, (as do several other application servers) and because Tridion's own Content Delivery installation has these as third-party jars, any difference in the required versions will be problematic. Of course, it could happen with other libraries, but in practice, it's Xerces. (OK - so we also had similar issues with another application that uses JSTL.)

But let's start with "parent first" and "parent last". When working with the hierarchy of classloaders, the default method of loading a class is parent first. What this means is that when the module classloader needs to load a class, it first checks to see if its parent (the application classloader) can load the class. The application classloader then asks its parent, and so on all the way up. I've visualised this in the left hand diagram with the arrows going down, because in practice, what this means is that classes are made available from the top down. If the java classloaders have the class, that's what will be used throughout. 

Parent last is the opposite arrangement. If the module classloader can find the class in its classpath, it loads it itself and doesn't trouble the parents with it. This effectively means that the lower the classloader, the higher priority its jars have, and hence the direction of the arrows in my right-hand diagram.  

Classloader Parent last                  Classloader Parent first

So to get rid of the ClassCastException, we flipped the configuration from Parent First to Parent Last. This works. It's what SDL recommend that you should do if you encounter these exceptions in your environment. But...

Well it turned out that our problems weren't over. Instead of a ClassCastException, now we had a ClassNotFoundException. I can't post it here, because all this happened a while ago and I'm writing this up later, but as I said earlier, it's all about Xerces. The problem in this case is that if a class is loaded by a classloader, it can't call a class that's loaded by a classloader that's lower in the hierarchy. Parent last leaves you rather more sensitive to this kind of problem, because you're deliberately loading classes lower down that might also be available further up the tree, and also might be expected by classes further up. In any case, even though the class is available, it can't be loaded, and you get a ClassNotFoundException. 

In our case, we were able to solve the problem by moving the xalan and serialiser jars to Websphere's ws.ext directory, where they would be loaded by the Websphere Extensions classloader. 

All this is a bit like the "dll hell" that we used to waste days on on Windows systems before the .NET framework came along. Sooner or later, the answer always ended up being that you needed to know far more than you wanted to about the nuts and bolts of how it all worked, and the various possible locations that Windows would look for a dll. "Classloader hell" is not much different. I've been able to avoid it for a long time just by breezily saying - "Oh yes - that's a Java problem". These days, I seem to be more engaged with Java than I used to be, so having to figure out classloader hell is probably fair game. 

It's been a while since I linked to Joel Spolsky's classic: "The law of leaky abstractions", but this seems like a reasonable moment to do so. Joel's piece probably makes for far more entertaining reading than either this, or this, (both of which are pretty good) or any of the other detailed coverage that Google will turn up for you on the complexities of classloaders. My own description here has been deliberately only a sketch to give the big picture. I've skated over many details, missed others out entirely, and probably got a few things wrong (in which case, comments are welcome). My point is that in any given environment, there's a good chance you'll have to solve this kind of thing. It's frustrating, and it costs time that you probably feel like you don't have, but once you engage with the detail, you will find a solution. I'm not saying the solution outlined here is the best one. There may be other ways to get it working, and some of them may well be better. 

To finish on a rather more upbeat note, we should all be happy to be moving slowly but surely towards the new architecture. Having to deal with these issues is actually a very welcome reminder of why we're investing in new architectures in the first place. The difficulty lies in the fact that you can't necessarily have a rebuild of all your legacy systems in the scope of an upgrade project, so we live with some things that aren't perfect, but we are moving in the right direction. Next time will be better! 

JRE/JDK 6u29 doesn't work with Tridion content delivery and MSSQL

Posted by Dominic Cronin at Feb 20, 2012 09:05 PM |
Filed under: , ,

I've just spent an excessive amount of time trying to get Content Delivery set up on my SDL Tridion 2011 SP1 image. I couldn't get the HttpUpload web page working, no matter how much I tweaked the various settings. Then I gave up on that and tried setting up a deployer service instead. Still no joy; it wouldn't start. Fortunately I was able to call on my friends in the Tridion community, and Nuno Linhares came up with the answer. It turns out that the specific update of Java I had installed somehow doesn't get along with some of the other pieces in the puzzle. According to Nuno, it had something to do with using MSSQL as well, but frankly, I was just pleased to find that when I uninstalled 6u29 and installed 6u30, everything worked fine. Thanks Nuno.